Journeys From My Doorstep

A Visual Diary

Photography by Roff Smith

Descending, Penshurst Lane

Descending, Penshurst Lane

With more and more cars on the roads these days I find myself wandering further afield, deeper into the weald, on smaller less explored lanes seeking quiet and solitude. This on a steeply descending switchback on Penshurst Lane, just before dawn. 

Veiled Sunrise

Veiled Sunrise

A dense autumn ground mist cloaked the coastal marshes this morning. 

Encounters, Old Marsh Road

Encounters, Old Marsh Road

With the end of lockdown traffic on our roads – even quiet country lanes – has picked up dramatically – not merely to pre-Covid levels, but to new heights of busy-ness as people avoid public transport like the…uh…well, plague, and carpooling has become not only unfashionable but downright illegal in some instances, given the ever-shifting social distancing and no-mingle regulations. And so there are lots of cars in the morning. When later sunrises are thrown into the mix, my once-quiet pre-dawn rides across the marsh have taken on an urban commuting feel, with car after car sweeping by, solitude out the window and the throb of engines replacing the soft splashes of waterfowl and the whirr of insects in tall grass.

Carnival Glass

Carnival Glass

Low tide on the beach at Hastings, a few minutes before sunrise on a warm clear Indian summer morning, and the damp sands are shimmering like carnival glass. 

An Antique Light, Bexhill-on-Sea

An Antique Light, Bexhill-on-Sea

A quiet dawn and a fragile, antique light along the seafront promenade at Bexhill on Sea. I’ve always liked this wonderfully ornate late-Victorian (1896) shelter and have been waiting for ages for just the right sort of complimentary light in which to photograph it. With the run of fine Indian summer days we’ve had lately I’ve been riding over to Bexhill before dawn each morning and setting up my tripod and then waiting and watching as the sun rose and bathed the shelter in varying lights. I took many, many shots over the days and while i had some that I liked, none of them quite captured the antique feel I was after. But then finally it happened – a dawn with perfectly clear skies and that beautifully translucent champagne light. And I captured this image. 

Bicycle Path, St Leonard’s-on-Sea

Bicycle Path, St Leonard’s-on-Sea

Traffic has picked up noticeably since the lockdown eased and now with the resumption of the school year, it has picked up even more. Coupled with the later sunrises – this morning’s was at 6:34 – I am finding it harder and harder to shoot quiet country scenes. Those quiet little lanes are not all mine anymore, and the ride home is becoming more and more unpleasant in fast and aggressive peak-hour traffic. And so lately I’ve been shooting on the promenades along the seafronts in Bexhill and St Leonard’s-on-Sea. This I shot just before dawn this morning on the seaside bicycle in St Leonard’s, near the ruins of the old lido. 

Smoke From A Distant Fire

Smoke From A Distant Fire

Although the morning was predicted to be clear, a thick haze had crept over the sky by the time I reached Bexhill, at about half past five. I had planned on taking some predawn shots elsewhere along the seafront and was feeling rather glum about the dull light when I happened to glance to the east and saw a huge magenta sun smouldering in the haze over the Channel. It was unreal, otherworldly. I grabbed my tripd and camera, set up quickly – there was little time for the niceties of composition – and began shooting this very strange sunrise. I’ve since read that modelling from NOAA suggests that this eerie sunrise may have been due in part to smoke from the bushfires raging in California, Oregon and Washington.  

A Dawn Start

A Dawn Start

Making plans by lamplight. Early morning along the esplanade at Bexhill-on-Sea.

Harbour Lights

Harbour Lights

The mornings are getting noticeably darker now, with the sun not rising until twenty minutes past six. As I spun along the Bexhill seafront in the dark at half past five on this rare perfectly clear morning, with a slack tide and calm seas, I couldn’t resist pausing to enjoy this view over the English Channel. 

Morning Sun, Bexhill-on-Sea

Morning Sun, Bexhill-on-Sea

Another Hopperesque image, this one inspired by Edward Hopper’s 1952 painting Morning Sun. It was taken at the King George V Coronation Colonnade on the seafront at Bexhill-on-Sea. This one took a surprising amount of work and patience. I had a general idea of what I wanted and kept going back every morning for a week, trying out different compositions and, since each sunrise is different, varying qualities of light. I had a couple of images that I kind of liked, but what I really wanted was perfectly clear skies. That’s a big ask in  England. Every evening I would check the weather – the Met Office, I’ve learned from long experience, has a way of dangling clear morning skies like a carrot and then when you wake up you find it ain’t so (and that they’ve changed their forecast during the night to match the real-life conditions). But then it happened, a perfectly clear dawn. I woke to a sky full of stars. I couldn’t believe my luck. In my eagerness I hastened over there an hour before sunrise – way too early – and stood about anxiously, certain that some great cloudbank would come along and ruin it. But it didn’t. The sun dawned clear and bright. And I got busy with my camera.

Having done so much trial-run preparation during the week, artists studies if you will, I knew right where to set up my tripod. Since the ground falls away from the colonnade, I had to shoot from a gentle rise about fifty metres distant, which meant a fifty meter dash for every take. While I do a lot of cycling, I don’t do much running and during the course of the week, and this morning’s shoot, I must have run several miles’ worth of windsprints. By my final frames I was having to give my achy legs a couple of extra seconds to get into position. Still, I was happy to do it and pleased with the results.

Bexhill on Riviera

Bexhill on Riviera

A sunny bank holiday weekemd, a bicycle and an open road. It doesn't get much better than that. I went for a Mediterranean vibe this morning, something suggestive of more distant and romantic travels than just a spin along the familiar old English seaside. Just...

Fresh Gale, Bexhill-on-Sea

Fresh Gale, Bexhill-on-Sea

A line of squalls blew in from the Atlantic, bringing heavy cloud and wind-whipped raindrops along the seafront at Bexhill. This taken shortly before dawn at the King George V Coronation Colonnade along the promenade with the tattered Union Jack fluttering in the gusts.

Early Morning, Bexhill Seafront

Early Morning, Bexhill Seafront

I’ve long been a fan of Edward Hopper and his portrayals of solitude, insularity, pensiveness and the sort of bittersweet after-hours melancholy that characterises much of his work – all themes that play well with today’s world of social distancing and isolation. But there is a hidden resilience in his characters too, that often goes unremarked. In this ornate Edwardian shelter along the seafront promenade at Bexhill-on-Sea, I saw a chance to capture some of this resilience in a quintessentially Hopperesque setting and style. Here, the solitary cyclist is facing the sun, consulting a map, making plans, envisioning a future, and with the means at hand to take himself there, make it happen. To create this image I visited the shelter repeatedly over a succession of mornings, photographing it from different angles, then waited for a morning of soft diffused light. In keeping with the tone of the image, and to make sure the paper colour of the map didn’t conflict in any way, I used an original 1919 motoring and cycling map of southern England.

Consulting Map, Bexhill-on-Sea

Consulting Map, Bexhill-on-Sea

Continuing to play with the Edwardian shelters on the Bexhill seafront, with a Hopperesque image this morning, helped along in no small part by the delightful pink light that bathed the scene in the moments before sunrise.  

Early Morning, Bexhill Promenade

Early Morning, Bexhill Promenade

More of a photo-journalistic feel to this morning’s offering, a snapshot of a moment. For some months now this Edwardian shelter on the seafront at Bexhill-on-Sea has been undergoing restoration, surrounded by chain link and construction cladding. This week, all was unveiled and, what has been especially nice for me, the lights have been left on an all-night timer, making a nicely lit stage set for this image of a cyclist planning a ride in the blue hour before dawn .

Dead Calm on The English Channel

Dead Calm on The English Channel

The sea was eerily slack this morning when I was riding along the promenade at Bexhill-on-Sea, as calm as a lake on a still day and with a thick misty haze obscuring the horizon. The tide was in and the concrete jetty looked to me like an empty stage. I hopped off my bicycle and made my way out onto it. An obliging fishermen, out to catch some mackerel, let me have the stage to myself for this shot. 

Sunrise Along A Sunken Lane

Sunrise Along A Sunken Lane

Dawn sunshine illuminates the branches of the forest canopy over this old sunken lane in the Sussex weald.

Sunrise Over Galley Hill

Sunrise Over Galley Hill

One nice way to freshen up after a hot sticky sleepless night is an easy predawn spin along the seafront, your cheeks fanned by a gentle breeze of your own making and with the splendour the sunrise to put the day back on track. 

Hopperesque

Hopperesque

I like the sense of isolation and thoughtful solitude in Edward Hopper’s paintings and saw a chance to affect some of that same sense myself in this image taken at the Edwardian shelter on the seafront at Bexhill-on-Sea. 

An Edwardian Confection

An Edwardian Confection

I love the old Edwardian shelters along the seafront promenade at Bexhill-on-Sea, this particular one especially. There’s something exuberantly frivolous about all the fretwork and curlicues and elaborate architecture simply to provide cover for a public bench. It says something about the times when they were built, when aesthetics were as important as function. Councils would never spend money building something so elegant and frivolous today. This morning I had the benefit of both aesthetics and function, while I was shooting this scene on this warm muggy dawn a fine cool sprinkling rain began to fall.  

Liquorice Allsort

Liquorice Allsort

A lovely dawn light over the English Channel this morning ahead of what the Met Office tells us is likely to be the warmest day of the year.

Barley Moon over Beachy Head

Barley Moon over Beachy Head

August’s full moon is the Barley Moon. With clear skies and the moon set coinciding with low tide and sunrise I rode down to the beach at Bexhill before dawn this morning to watch the Barley Moon set over the cliffs at Beachy Head. 

Vicarious Sunrise , Compass Lane

Vicarious Sunrise , Compass Lane

You can’t really see the sunrise when you’re cycling along these ancient dark sunken lanes in the Sussex weald, but you can get a wonderful sense of what is going on out of view when the sun’s early rays illuminate the forest canopy above you.  This along Compass Lane, near the village of Ninfield, East Sussex.

Going To Be A Hot One

Going To Be A Hot One

First rays of sunshine glow on the flank of a distant hillside near the village of Doleham at the start of a hot and muggy day late in July. 

First Light on The Marsh

First Light on The Marsh

First rays of morning sunshine illuminate the tall grasses along the marsh road on the homeward-bound leg of my ride to Pevensey.  

Old School – Journey With Maps

Old School – Journey With Maps

One place you’ll never find me is on Strava. Or pedalling around with one of the nifty GPS-equipped cycling computers that uses satellite tracking to tell me where I am, how fast I am going and how much elevation I’ve gained or lost in the course of my ride. If I am uncertain of my location, I look at a map. As to speed I am generally either going slow or slower, and my legs give me a sufficient indication of how much climbing I’ve done and whether or not a hill is steep or really steep. I am old school in this regard and quite happy to remain that way. For the purposes of authenticity in taking this photo, I used a 1919 cycling map of the south of England. And what is especially nice about it is that on the crooked little Sussex lanes I follow, it is almost perfectly accurate!

Cruising Altitude

Cruising Altitude

Just to show you don’t need to hop on a jet to enjoy the magic of a sunrise above the clouds – a spin along the old marsh road in the hours before dawn found me on this gentle rise, with thick ground fog clinging to the lowlands, just as the sun broke above the horizon – giving me a chance to enjoy a once familiar spectacle that I hadn’t seen since the last time I was on an airplane, returning from South America in March. 

A Watercolour Wash

A Watercolour Wash

Dazzling sunshine and patchy ground mist created a pleasing watercolour wash effect to the backdrop of this stretch of quiet country lane near Norman’s Bay, along the Sussex coast.  

Promenade Deck

Promenade Deck

Spinning along the seaside promenade at Hastings, one can easily imagine that one’s pedalling along the deck of some grand old liner, with its white-painted nautical railings and the wide blue sea spreading away to starboard.  

Ground Mist, Sunrise

Ground Mist, Sunrise

I set out very, very early this morning in the hopes of glimpsing the comet Neowise in the dark skies over the marsh. The comet proved elusive, but the sunrise was lovely with the ground mist clinging to the landscape.

A Murky Morning Along The Marsh Road

A Murky Morning Along The Marsh Road

It was heavily overcast when I set out this morning at 3:30am with patchy ground mist clinging to the landscape along the marsh road, but a quiet sort of beauty nonetheless.

Off On A Journey

Off On A Journey

There’s no finer place to witness a sunrise than from the saddle of a bicycle on a country road miles from home. 

Daybreak

Daybreak

Cresting a rise on the marsh road just at daybreak on a hot summer morning.

Ahead of The Crowd

Ahead of The Crowd

Spinning along the seafront promenade at Bexhill-on-Sea bright and early on a warm sultry July morning. Later on the promenade will be bustling with day-trippers and beach goers, and the ice cream kiosk will be doing brisk trade, but for now I had this lovely sunlit stretch of promenade all to myself.  

Carpe Diem

Carpe Diem

Seizing the day on the old marsh road…I had been wanting to try something new in photographing the marsh road, something with a different style and tone, and so I set up my tripod along the side of a stretch of road that nearly – but not quite – ran into the sunrise. I used a wide-angle lens  to get a sense of the road leading into the horizon and relied on the dark backdrop of marsh grass for visual contrast wit the bicycle. I was pleased with the results, but more pleased with it still when I used a sepia toner to create a more uniform tone.

Monochrome Mist

Monochrome Mist

No, this isn’t a black-and-white photograph  but real life: the result of thick sea fog, dense shadows and diffuse sunshine that created this stark monochrome landscape through which I rode along the old marsh road to Pevensey this morning. 

La Vie En Rose

La Vie En Rose

Pink dawn by the old beach huts along the seafront at St Leonard’s-on-Sea 

Café Stop

Café Stop

A pause at a deserted beachfront café near the ruins of the old lido at St Leonard-on-Sea. 

Low Tide at Hastings

Low Tide at Hastings

Sunrise over the English Channel: morning sun shimmers on the low tide sands along the beach at Hastings

Golden  Mist on The Marsh

Golden Mist on The Marsh

Good old marsh road – always worth the trouble of rising early and setting out by lamplight to be there for the dawn’s early light. It wasn’t just the magic of mists and golden sunshine that made the morning special, but the lively dawn chorus of chattering birds, waterfowl and the insects whirring in the tall grass that brought the landscape to life.  

Straight On ‘Til Dawn

Straight On ‘Til Dawn

A spin along the seafront promenade at Bexhill-on-Sea at the start of what promises to be a warm and sultry summer day.

Out of The Woods

Out of The Woods

Bursting into morning sunshine along a leafy Sussex lane just at daybreak, near the village of Fairlight

Penny Bright

Penny Bright

A rolling sea mist and a smouldering orb of a sun combine to cast a rich orange glow over the landscape at the start of a hot summer day along the old marsh road not far from Pevensey. 

Light and Shadow

Light and Shadow

The sunken mediaeval lanes that meander through the Sussex weald are delightful to ride along – moody and atmospheric, they’re like pedalling into the pages a storybook. But gosh, they are tough to photograph. The shade beneath the forest canopy is dense enough that even on a bright summer morning you can find yourself in need of a headlamp – especially with potholes and damp leaves and broken branches along the way. At the same time the shafts of sunlight coming through breaks in the canopy create hot spots in the image. It’s tricky to find the right balance. This image taken early in the morning along Pannell Lane, between the villages of Pett and Winchelsea.  

Travelling Hopefully

Travelling Hopefully

A silvery disc of sun shimmers through a break in the clouds on a thundery and unsettled morning along the marsh road. 

Copperplate

Copperplate

Could this possibly be the soft leafy Sussex whose lanes we know and ride each morning? It was over 20ºC when I went out the door at half past three this morning and when the sun rose over the old marsh road it dawned hot and harsh – none of that gentle English glow today. Instead a metallic glare that bleached out the colours and cast hard shadows.

Rider of the Purple Shadows

Rider of the Purple Shadows

Purple shadows and a sky full of promise and bright yellow sunshine at the start of a warm sultry summer day on the old marsh road. 

The Miles Before Dawn

The Miles Before Dawn

There’s a delicious satisfaction in being out and about on a country lane, spinning along under your own steam, while all the rest of polite society is still home in bed with the shutters drawn. This image was taken about twenty past four this morning not far from the village of Brede. 

Sunrise, Moonset

Sunrise, Moonset

Like Thoreau in Walden I am a self-appointed inspector of sunrises and moonsets. Where he was obliged to make his rounds on foot, I have the luxury of making mine on a doughty old English tourer.

Menace

Menace

With many people returning to work this week and hardly anybody using public transport, the roads are filling up with traffic. Even the lonely marsh road is suddenly surprisingly busy, at four o’clock in the morning no less, with early bird commuters taking a short cut to Eastbourne, Lewes or Brighton. This morning a thick sea mist lay over the landscape and as I was shooting I kept being interrupted by the passage of automobiles. I cursed under my breath as I heard them motoring up out of the fog behind me, but later when I was home and editing the images I found I was rather intrigued by the sense of menace created by their approaching headlamps.

Serendipity

Serendipity

After setting out from the house by starlight at quarter to four this morning, full of jaunty expectancy and visions of capturing the crescent moon hovering over the bicycle path along the promenade at St Leonards-on-Sea I arrived at the seafront twenty minutes later to find the moon hiding behind a creeping veil of cloud with little prospect of change. I loitered anyway, hoping for a break in the cloud or, failing that, an attractive slant of sunshine once the sun finally rose. I got neither, but as I idled on the promenade, in the pale light of dawn, I looked out to sea and noticed this fishing boat surrounded by gulls, not far off shore, catching the makings of today’s fish & chips. And so instead of doing a cycling shot this morning I aimed my camera out to sea, channeled my inner Winslow Homer and came up with this image.

Blue Hour, St Leonards-on-Sea

Blue Hour, St Leonards-on-Sea

I liked the stylised simplicity of this composition – the repetition of these beach huts and the silhouette of the lamplit cyclist against the dense navy blue of a hazy June pre-dawn sky. I set up my camera in the weedy lot which back in the 1930s was the huge public swimming pool of the St Leonards lido and made a few passes along this stretch of the seafront bicycle path. The time was about 4:20am  – half an hour or so before sunrise.

Bottle Alley Blues

Bottle Alley Blues

A bit of an urban vibe this morning with a spin along Bottle Alley, the 1930s covered promenade on the Hastings seafront.

Early Sunday Morning

Early Sunday Morning

In this new era of isolation and aloneness, my take on Edward Hopper’s Early Sunday Morning (1930), captured along Cambridge Road in Hastings in the blue hour before dawn – on a Sunday, naturally.

Carnival Glass

Carnival Glass

Blink and you miss it. Like the iridescence in carnival glass the colours in the pre-dawn sky this morning were shifting constantly. As I photographed this scene with the moon and the domes of the King George V Coronation Pavilion the colours in the sky shifted rapidly from deep blue, through a suite of mauves, violets and purples each shade lasting only seconds…

Strawberry Moon

Strawberry Moon

I was delighted to see that clear skies for forecast for early this morning – to coincide with the setting of the Strawberry Moon, as June’s full moon is known. And with the sunrise at 4:46am and the moon scheduled to set at 5:17am it gave me a nice window for shooting. Having a low tide as well was icing on the cake. 

English Miles, Rosemary Lane

English Miles, Rosemary Lane

Travels at Home: I like the old wooden mileposts one encounters on the lanes, legacies of an era when distance and miles meant more than they do today. Given the way the world is evolving at the moment, this quaintly old-fashioned grasp of distance and travel may be coming back into vogue.

Lido Shuffle

Lido Shuffle

This lonely column is all that remains of the once glorious St Leonard’s Lido, built back in the 1930s doing the glory days of the English seaside holiday. At the time of its opening it was the second biggest lido in Britain, sporting a million-gallon pool, diving platforms, a roller skating rink, cafes, and underground parking. More than 33,000 visitors flocked to the site the first week it opened, late in May of 1933. Alas that was the only summer the enormous complex ever turned a profit. It was closed and demolished decades ago, with only this solitary column standing as a reminder.

Ices, Bexhill

Ices, Bexhill

This old ice cream kiosk on the deserted seafront promenade at Bexhill-on-Sea and the impersonal space around it called to mind the sort of after-hours melancholy of an Edward Hopper painting. I pedalled down there at 4am this morning and making use of the rich blue pre-dawn twilight, and the isolating taillight on my bicycle, with its suggestion of solitude and retreat, made a Hopperesque image of my own.

Civil Twilight

Civil Twilight

Civil twilight is the unromantic astromonical term for that magic period just before sunrise (or just after sunset) when the sun is six degrees or less below the horizon, near enough to cast a pleasing glow in the sky. This morning, according to the almanac I use to plan my rides, Civil Twilight began at 4:05am in my part of Sussex at this time of year.  That means an early start. I had already ridden twelve miles by then, and was pedalling along this leafy little lane near Rye to a cheerful dawn chorus.

Fourteen Per Cent

Fourteen Per Cent

I have been planning this shot for some time, waiting for the leafy canopy to thicken and for the leaves themselves to get that rich summery green. The plan was to head out very, very earlyone morning wearing a scarlet jersey for contrast and to arrive at the hilltop on this little lane near Fairlight just at sunup, wen the sun’s first rays pop through an opening in the greenery enough to illuminate a cyclist churning up this steep grade. I had the vision, and the ambition, but when it ame to crawling out of bed and being on the road by 3:30am, with the prospect of a long and very hilly ride on darkened lanes to get where I needed to be, I found myself conjurnig up reasons for putting off this particular shoot. Eventually though I summoned the resolve and made the hilly, lamplit trek out here and then put in the effort of doing multiple takes on this fourteen per cent grade. It was definitely a case of suffering for my art, but I was pleased with the results. 

Sentinel Oaks

Sentinel Oaks

Sentinel oaks and a splash of early morning sunshine along a country lane near the town of Rye, East Sussex. Who’d be anywhere else?

Wickham Lane, Winchelsea

Wickham Lane, Winchelsea

It’s a quarter to five in the morning along an evocative old sunken lane near the village of Winchelsea. By now I’ve already ridden over an hour by lamplight along darkened streets and down winding country lanes to be here. A subtle pink glow in the sky and just barest tinge of warmth on the sandstone facade of the farmhouse on the hill behind me is the first tantalising hint that sunrise is not far off.

Great Expectations

Great Expectations

I had an audience on my ride across the marsh this morning – something I’m not accustomed to given my early starts – and for novelty’s sake I paused to capture this image. A friend of mine, seeing it, said it reminded him of the opening scene to Great Expectations. I rather liked that. Although I took several frames, this one appealed to me the most: where the cow is breaking the Fourth Wall, staring into the camera and communicating to the viewer her wonderment at what was going on.

Golden Delicious

Golden Delicious

A burst of intense golden sunshine on my morning ride to Pevensey. There’s no more satisfying place to enjoy a sunrise than from the saddle of a bicycle when you’re miles from home, having been up and out and taking a measure of the day while the rest of the world is home in bed.

Leafy Sussex

Leafy Sussex

No prizes for guessing why Sussex is known as “Leafy Sussex”. The richness and vivacity of the  spring leaves in the forest canopy along the lanes makes them a delight to ride along on a bright Sunday morning in May. This image captured along Stonestile Lane, between Hastings and Westfield.

Catching A Crescent

Catching A Crescent

I love crescent moons. There is something magical about them. So when I saw that a fine thin crescent moon would be rising at 3:59am this morning, and the prediction was for generally clear skies, I realised that an early start would be in order if I wanted to catch it before the sun rose and faded it out. With sunrise this morning slated for 5:05am it gave me a narrow window of opportunity – especially since the particular country lane I had in mind for the shot, where I knew I could get a good view of the rising moon, was a good 45 minutes’ ride away. I was out the door by 3:40am, pedalling hopefully into the darkened countryside. The result, I think, was worth the effort.

Greeting The Dawn

Greeting The Dawn

There is something exhilarating about pedalling into a sunrise when you’re miles from home, having already ridden a long ways by lamplight while all the rest of polite society is home in bed. It makes a day feel as bright and full of possibilities as a new-minted penny.

Tunnels of Leaves

Tunnels of Leaves

As spring advances towards summer the leaves on the trees take on a rich summery greenness and form dense canopies over the little lanes in the weald – such as this one near the village of Fairlight. Pedalling along them by lamplight in the grey hours before dawn and then bursting out into clear morning sunshine, with the rolling Sussex countryside spreading away, gives me a giddy sense of adventure and going places on my morning rides.

Nighthawk

Nighthawk

It’s surprising what you can discover when you explore your neighbourhood by bicycle – slowly, intimately, camera in hand, looking upon the familiar with fresh eyes. I’d been past this corner on London Road countless times in the past, by bus and in cars, but I’d never before noticed its peculiar Hopperesque quality. I love Edward Hopper’s art. Always have. His distinctive blend of pensiveness, melancholy, solitude, use of stark impersonal space and the edgy after-hours feel he manages to conjure in his work has always appealed to me.  When I came upon this desolate street corner at 4:30am as I pedalled along the seafront in Hastings, I immediately thought of Hopper’s iconic 1942 painting Nighthawks. And so I set up my tripod across the street and created this tribute to it.

The Noblest Invention

The Noblest Invention

What a glorious thing a bicycle is – jaunty, elegant, easy to repair and maintain, almost glib in its 19th century simplicity, it can carry us anywhere we want to go, anytime we like, at the drop of a hat, be it just down to the shops or around the world. And it will do it swiftly, cleanly and for free. And yet at the same time it’s lightweight enough to tuck under your arm and carry up a flight of stairs.

Sunrise, Sluice Lane

Sunrise, Sluice Lane

Sunrise cast a soft painterly glow over the landscape this morning – a contrast to the histrionic sunrises, blown highlights and rosy-gold mists I’ve been witnessing lately on my marsh rides. Today’s show came with a better soundtrack though – an overture of waterfowl honking, quacking and splashing, songbirds trilling and countless insects buzzing and whirring in the grass –  everybody getting an early start on what promises to be a fine warm summery day.

Lanterne Rouge

Lanterne Rouge

A landmark hill on the homeward leg of my old familiar ride across the marsh to Pevensey. Here I’m still a good forty-five minutes out, with home and hearth and a fresh pot of coffee waiting up the road. I have been wanting to capture this image for quite some time, but until this morning the lure of home and fresh coffee would invariably bring out the procrastinator in me: I’d do it another day. This morning though I was out on the marsh especially early – before 5am – and the light was perfect, irresistible. And so I pulled over, set up tripod and camera and captured this image.

Red Sun in Morning

Red Sun in Morning

I just had a feeling it was going to be one of those smouldering sunrises this morning, and so I left the house extra early to be sure to be in position in time – and given the early sunrise times around here, and the time it takes to pedal out into the marsh, that meant setting off at 4am sharp. My hopes built when I saw the thick ground mist shrouding the landscape and sure enough, this luminous orb of sun simmered above the horizon at twenty past five. Looking at it, one could imagine being somewhere exotic and far away – Africa, perhaps – instead of familiar old Sussex, but such is the magic of travelling at home.  

A Sussex Lane

A Sussex Lane

As a travel romantic, escapist and cycling Luddite who rides an old-school tourer with quill stem, flat pedals and an old-fashioned Carradice saddlebag dangling from a Brooks saddle, it’s no surprise that I seek out images that evoke a long-lost, possibly mythical golden era of cycling in the English landscape. This picturesque stretch of Sussex lane, near the village of Doleham, was too evocative to pass up.

The Pea Souper

The Pea Souper

I especially love those murky pre-dawn rides along the promenade when a thick sea mist is rolling in off the Channel, although they can be awfully tricky to photograph. This image taken along the seafront at Bexhill-on-Sea

The Hill at Doleham

The Hill at Doleham

Some of the hills in the Sussex weald are no joke – such as this gentle rise coming out of the village of Doleham. To be fair, this particular hill  looks a bit steeper than it actually is, thanks to the foreshortening effects of a 200mm telephoto and the fact that the landscape in the backdrop is also on a steeply rising hill on the opposite flank of a narrow valley – so call it a poetic truth. The hills up here are steep and engaging and the crooked little lanes that go up and down them put the ‘travail’ back into travel and involve you richly in the landscape.

Velvet Sunrise

Velvet Sunrise

Luck plays a role in getting an image like this but as with many things in life I find that the more I plan, the luckier I get.  I’ve witnessed countless sunrises from the saddle of a bicycle and have become adept at gauging the density of haze along the horzon on warmish mornings. Seeing the heavy band of violet haze along the eastern sky this morning, I guessed that we wee in for one of those haunting “luminous orb” sunrises. Knowing – through much observation  – roughly where the sun was going to appear at this time of year, I hastened to this well-placed, picturesque bend I knew about on the old marsh road hoping that I might just get ‘lucky’.

Geometry of Light

Geometry of Light

As an artist and keen observer of sunrises and the drape of light and shadow, I can never resist the thrilling geometry of a fan of sunbeans bursting through the branches. Not often do you find them so beautifully arrayed and in a place where hedgerows and a bend in the road form an almost perfect, if empty, stage. The only trick here was trying to place myself squarely in the spotlight.

Impression, Sunrise

Impression, Sunrise

Channelling my inner Monet this morning with the help of a dense sea mist and this  soft yellow sunrise. I have been wanting to do something with this particular stretch of marsh road for quite some time.  I loved the juxtaposition of creek, marsh grasses, the billow of trees and the sense of being abroad on the marsh, alone, early in the morning. I’ve stopped and photographed it a number of times but without ever capturing its magic – until this morning with this impressionist sunrise and the suggestion of romance and mystery. 

A Fresh Light

A Fresh Light

One of the many joys of exploring the world that lies at your doorstep is the continual rediscovery of places that had seemed drearily familiar. I’ve ridden along the old marsh road countless times over the years but coming upon this serpentine curve this morning on my bicycle ride, seeing it bathed in clean lemony sunshine, was like seeing it for the very first time. I marvelled that I had never noticed its beauty before, and stopped to capture this image.

The Hawthorne in Bloom

The Hawthorne in Bloom

Oh the joys of being out and about on a bicycle early on these bright clear mornings and witnessing first hand the rapid progression of spring. Suddenly, and seeming out of the blue, the hawthorn has come into bloom along the hedgerows – a real spirit lifter on an early morning ride. And so I paused to capture this image.

A Quiet Village

A Quiet Village

An early morning spin through the sleepy village of Doleham in the Sussex weald. I liked the soft painterly effect of the light at this time of the morning. Coupled with the picturesque setting it created the pleasing sense of pedalling into a romanticised magazine illustration out of the 1920s.

Ancient Oaks, Near Wartling

Ancient Oaks, Near Wartling

I liked the backdrop of bare branches and these ancient ivy-decked oaks huddling close by this narrow lane not far from the village of Wartling. Once the leaves come into bud, the scene will change completely. I wanted to get it while it was still bare and autumnal – and so I pedalled for an hour and a half by lamplight in order to be here for sunrise and made certain to wear a jersey whose colour would stand out but still be in keeping with the mood.

The Great Whispering Hush

The Great Whispering Hush

I love the sense of mystery and adventure that comes with a ride by lamplight through the thick sea mist on the marsh – the great pre-dawn hush broken only by the whirring of insects, the eerie cries and splashes of unseen waterfowl, and the rhythmic whirr of my bicycle chain as I spin along the lonely lane guided by the glow of my lamp. 

Racing The Sunrise

Racing The Sunrise

Sunrise this morning found me on the crest of this gentle rise, about a third of the way along the old marsh road between Cooden and Pevensey. I like the gnarled wind-shaped tree here and the way it frames the road and often I try to make use of this setting in my images. This morning it was was especially beautiful, illuminated by a vibrant red sunrise which, coupled with the  dense ground mist, bathed the scene in this rich, rosy light. 

The Romance of Travel

The Romance of Travel

We might not be able to travel much in these lockdown days, or indeed, stray far from home, but it doesn’t mean we can’t dream.  This image taken King George V Coronation Pavilion, overlooking the seafront at Bexhill-on-Sea.

The Dark Wood

The Dark Wood

Skeletal trees, a clammy ground mist and the eerie bluish light before dawn combined to create an interesting Forbidden Forest atmosphere to this stretch of the old marsh road on my ride over to Pevensey this morning. 

La Vie En Rose

La Vie En Rose

This was one of those rare delightful mornings when I had the pleasure of two separate sunrises – the first when the sun peeped over the horizon, a bref burst of hard orange sunlight before the sun disappeared in a thick band of haze. The ‘second sunrise’ a few minutes later was altogether grander, shooting broad rays across the landscape, casting the marsh in a fine pink light and with the sun, gently dimmed by mist, riding moonlike on a sea of clouds.

Earth Tones

Earth Tones

A chilly dawn and a slant of pale wintry light illuminates this stretch of a narrow country lane not far from the village of Rye.  I had scouted this scene earlier and liked the atmosphere created by the weathered fenceposts and the suite of withered browns and bare branches in the backdrop.  I waited for a crisp clear morning and made a point of wearing a sandy coloured jersey to complement the overall colour palette of the scene.

Beach Huts, St Leonards-on-Sea

Beach Huts, St Leonards-on-Sea

A quiet moment to witness the sunrise at the end of a thirty-something-mile pre-dawn to Eastbourne and back. Like Henry David Thoreau in Walden, I consider myself something of an inspector of sunrises, phases of the moon and the state of the tides. 

A Bicycle Ride

A Bicycle Ride

During the course of my daily ramblings on my bicycle, I go many places that aren’t on any map – to new ideas and old memories, passages in books, drafts of stories I mean to write and proposals I mean to send to editors, to imagined dialogues with the famous and infamous, to alternate paths by life might have followed. That’s one of the chief joys of a bicycle ride, something I felt stirring within me from the very first time I set off down the street on my doughty old Schwinn newsboy as a child: I can go anywhere!